Social IMPACT Research Center Publications

The Social IMPACT Research Center has an extensive portfolio of needs assessment and evaluation research on issues facing poor and low-income populations. Our user-friendly work equips nonprofits, foundations, and governments to advance real-world solutions to poverty.
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2015 State Rankings Data

March 16, 2015

This companion to the report Poor by Comparison contains state rankings on over 25 different indicators related to poverty.

The Value of the Nonprofit Arts and Culture Field in Illinois: A Social Return on Investment Analysis with Donors Forum

March 15, 2015

This Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis compares the public and private investment into the Illinois nonprofit arts and culture field to the social and economic value it creates for the individuals who experience the programs as participants, audience members, visitors and event-goers, and for society as a whole. Key findings include: Every dollar invested into the Illinois nonprofit arts and culture field generates an estimated $27 in socio-economic value.$23 of this socio-economic value accrues to individuals participating in nonprofit arts and culture programs, events, and activities.$4 of this socio-economic value accrues to society through increased tax revenue, increased spending in the state due to arts and culture jobs, and the ripple effect of audience spending in Illinois.The real utility of an SROI lies in its ability to reveal if and how our investments into programs pay off. And on that, this SROI of the nonprofit arts and culture field in Illinois is clear: investing in arts and culture yields dividends.

The Value of the Nonprofit Youth Development Field in Illinois: A Social Return on Investment Analysis with Donors Forum

March 15, 2015

This Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis compares the public and private investment into the Illinois nonprofit youth development field to the social and economic value it creates for the youth and families who experience the programs and for society as a whole. Almost $302 million is invested in over 275 Illinois nonprofits that do direct service youth development work, and those groups serve 1.2 million youth each year. Every dollar invested into the Illinois nonprofit youth development field generates an estimated $45 in socio-economic value.

The Value of the Nonprofit Environment Field in Illinois: A Social Return on Investment Analysis with Donors Forum

March 15, 2015

This Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis compares the public and private investment into the Illinois nonprofit environment field to the social, environmental, and economic value it creates for people who live in Illinois and for society as a whole. What does this investment in Illinois's environment yield?Every dollar invested into the Illinois nonprofit environment field generates an estimated $58 in socio-environmental-economic value.$45 of this socio-environmental-economic value accrues to the people of Illinois.$13 of this socio-environmental-economic value accrues to society through increased tax revenue, increased spending in the state due to environment sector jobs, and avoided spending to treat costly environmental problems.The real utility of an SROI lies in its ability to reveal if and how our investments into programs pay off. And on that, this SROI of the nonprofit environment field in Illinois is clear: investing in the environment yields dividends.

Poor by Comparison: Report on Illinois Poverty

January 29, 2015

A report that examines how Illinois compares to other states on over 25 key metrics associated with poverty and hardship. In addition to addressing the state budget's structural deficit and tax policy, the report offers additional recommendations that, if implemented, would help ensure the people of Illinois can live the best lives possible and make Illinois more competitive in the process.

Factsheet: Poverty in Illinois

September 18, 2014

This factsheet provides a snapshot of the most recent census data on poverty, extreme poverty, low-income rates, child poverty, health insurance coverage, and median household income for Illinois, Chicago, and the 6-County region with and without Chicago.

Healthcare; Poverty

50 Years Later: Report on Illinois Poverty

January 31, 2014

America holds a long-cherished reputation as a land of opportunity. Yet 50 years ago, more than one in five Americans lived in poverty. To combat this soaring inequality, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared a War on Poverty in his 1964 State of the Union address. The War on Poverty was part and parcel of Johnson's Great Society, a set of programs and policies designed to tackle social problems of the day. Fifty years later, how much progress has been made?Half a century after our country committed to an "unconditional war on poverty," it's high time to recalibrate the war to fit 2014 realities. To that end, this report provides an unprecedented snapshot of the last 50 years and uses data on the modern face of poverty in Illinois to inform the retooling of existing solutions and spur new innovations to help end poverty.

Poverty

Altgeld-Riverdale Consortium: Evaluation Findings

January 1, 2014

The Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) received a 9-month grant from the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority to support the further development of the Altgeld-Riverdale Consortium (ARC) in its efforts to improve safety in CHA's Altgeld Gardens and the surrounding Riverdale neighborhood in Chicago between January and September 2013.The Social IMPACT Research Center (IMPACT) at Heartland Alliance evaluated the group's efforts towards meeting the goals and objectives stated in the grant proposal.

Poverty Matters: It's Now 50/50, Chicago Region Poverty Growth is a Suburban Story

September 5, 2013

Nationwide, the number of people in poverty in the suburbs has now surpassed the number of people in poverty in central cities. Cities have long been thought to be home to the most and worst poverty. However, in the past several decades, the suburbs have experienced the greatest growth in poverty. In this brief, the Social IMPACT Research Center examines the distribution of poverty in Chicago and the suburbs over two decades. The findings suggest that from 1990 to 2011, poverty grew much more in the suburbs than in Chicago, and consequently, poverty became more equally distributed between Chicago and the suburbs.

Education; Employment; Poverty; Safety Net & Human Services

Chicago Neighborhood Indicators, 2011

June 7, 2013

Social IMPACT Research Center's analysis of the U.S. Census Bureau's 2007-2011 5-year American Community Survey.

Housing & Homelessness; Poverty

Getting by Getting Ahead: The 2009 Illinois Self-Sufficiency Standard

September 1, 2009

This report utilizes the 2009 Illinois Self-Sufficiency Standard to help answer these questions. The Self-Sufficiency Standard calculates a very basic, modest budget that helps us better understand the cost of living in each Illinois county for a variety of different family types -- from single adults all the way up to two adults with children of various ages and dependent adults in the household. It illustrates how much income families need to make ends meet, with no public or private assistance.

Asset Building & Financial Security; Poverty

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